Mrs Eaves is a transitional serif typeface designed by Zuzana Licko in 1996.


It is licensed by Emigre, a typefoundry run by Licko and husband Rudy VanderLans.


The typeface family includes roman, italic, petite capitals, small capitals, bold, and roman and italic ligatures.
Baskerville is a transitional serif typeface designed in 1757 by John Baskerville (1706–1775) in Birmingham, England.

It is positioned between the old style typefaces of William Caslon, and the modern styles of Giambattista Bodoni & Firmin Didot.

It was the culmination of a larger series of experiments to improve legibility which also included paper making and ink manufacturing.
John Baskerville, who had made a fortune in japanning before turning to printing when in his midforties, was responsible for several advances in printing technology. This enabled him to employ a typeface with sharper definition and thinner elements. It marks the move from the "garalde" to the transitional faces. In 1757 at Birmingham in England, John Baskerville designed a transitional serif typeface and named it "Baskerville".
As Baskerville was setting up his printing and type business, Mrs. Sarah Eaves moved in with him as a live-in housekeeper. Eventually Sarah's husband, Mr Richard Eaves abandoned her and their five children. Mrs. Eaves became Baskerville's mistress and eventual helpmate with typesetting and printing.
She married Baskerville within a month of her estranged husband's death. Like the widows of Caslon, Bodoni, and the daughters of Fournier, Mrs Sarah Eaves similarly completed the printing of the unfinished volumes that John Baskerville left upon his death.
The Czech-American designer Zuzana Licko wanted to revive the font Baskerville. In 1996 he created the font and named it Mrs Eaves as a tribute to Sarah Ruston Eaves, the love of John Baskerville's life. The selection of the name Mrs Eaves was to honor one of the forgotten women in the history of typography."

The Mrs. Eaves typeface was designed by Czech-American Zuzana Licko in 1996. It is a revival of Baskerville font and Zuzana Ličko named it Mrs Eaves as a tribute to Sarah Rus¬ton Eaves, the love of John Baskerville's life. Selection of the name Mrs Eaves was to honors one of the forgotten women in the history of typography."

Baskerville has a contrast between thick and thin strokes, making the serifs sharper and more tapered. The axis of rounded letters is shifted to a more vertical position. The curved strokes are circular in shape and the characters more regular.
There is a softness about the Mrs Eaves typeface that is quite intentional. Licko rounded the serifs and terminals, lowered the x-height, widened the lower case and reduced the contrast of Baskerville's thicks and thins. The result is very attractive, more organic.

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